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H is for Hummus

Over the last decade, hummus has become a popular dip and spread. The options are limitless when it comes to hummus. Below are a couple simple recipes to try out.

Chickpeas (or garbanzo beans, the debate rages on) are a fantastic way to add vegetable protein and fat to your diet. Chickpeas are also high in fiber (so they’ll keep you fuller longer), folate, and manganese. Freshly made hummus lasts about a week in the refrigerator and is an inexpensive party treat, snack, or appetizer. While some people prefer to use dried chickpeas, I always buy canned because I never know when I’ll make a batch of hummus. We tend to run frequently so I always keep a few cans in the pantry. Pair with whole grain flat bread, celery, carrots, broccoli, cucumber, or even sliced radish!

Hummus

Ingredients
  

  • 2 cans chickpeas drained
  • 1 Tbsp tahini
  • 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper only if you like spicy
  • Water as necessary

Instructions
 

  • In a blender or food processor, combine all ingredients until mixture is a fine paste. Add a few tablespoons of water at a time as necessary to reach desired consistency.

Notes

Note: If you want to take this hummus to the next level, add the minced garlic and 1 Tbsp of olive oil to a pan. Sautee on medium low until garlic is browned. Add to hummus mixture and blend according to instructions.

I’m always looking for some simple, nutrient-dense snacks that will satisfy my afternoon hunger. Hummus is an easy go-to for me. It is packed with protein and fiber, and I love all the delicious flavor variations. I like to use hummus as a dip for pretzels, chips, or vegetables. I also use it as a spread for sandwiches or toast. The possibilities are endless with this tasty snack! I usually buy it already made from the store, but I decided to experiment with making it at home. It is extremely easy to prepare, especially if you just make a basic hummus without any add-ins. For this recipe though, I wanted to try my favorite flavor of hummus: roasted eggplant. I think I will be making it a home a lot more often!

Roasted Eggplant Hummus

Ingredients
  

  • 1-2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large eggplant 2 cups roasted eggplant flesh
  • 1- 15.5 oz can of garbanzo beans chickpeas, liquid reserved
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Juice from one lemon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • ¾ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • Parsley

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 450.
  • Slice eggplant in half, lengthwise. Score the flesh side, slicing diagonal lines about ¼ – ½ inch deep. You will end up with a crisscross pattern on the flesh.
  • Brush the eggplant flesh with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place flesh-side down on a foil lined baking sheet. Cook for about 30 minutes or until the skins easily give when lightly pressed. Set out until cool enough to touch.
  • Add garbanzo beans, tahini, garlic, lemon juice, salt, cumin, smoked paprika, and 2 cups of the eggplant flesh (discard the skins) into a food processor. Process until a desired consistency is reached. I added about 2-3 tbsp of the garbanzo bean liquid to get the consistency I wanted.
  • Top with chopped parsley and extra virgin olive oil to serve.

Blog contributors:

Shelley Palmer is a senior Food and Nutrition major at The University of Alabama. She aspires to become a Registered Dietitian working in long term geriatric care. As a military spouse, she has traveled all around the world with her husband. Shelley enjoys making kimchi from scratch, spending time with her dogs, and working as a cook at a Continuing Care Retirement Community. 

Recipe courtesy of Seena Curry. Seena is a dietetics student at University of Alabama and expects to graduate in December. She hopes to find a career as a Registered Dietitian that combines her passions for food, nutrition education, and serving her community. Seena is a hobbyist food photographer and has an Instagram dedicated to her favorite recipes (sc_balancedeats). 

G is for Green Beans

I know, I know….we skipped the letter ‘F’. Actually, it works out that ‘F’ and ‘I’ go together in this series.

Stay tuned a couple more weeks to find out the scoop (pun intended). In the meantime, let’s look at G is for Green Beans.

Green beans are synonymous with the holidays in my family. But we don’t usually have the typical green bean casserole for Thanksgiving. Instead, my mom makes this sautéed green bean recipe for Christmas and New Year’s Eve every year. One of the best things about food is that certain dishes can bring back comforting, nostalgic feelings. When I eat this dish, I’m always reminded of past celebrations with family. I experience that same happiness I felt laughing around the dinner table as we shared a lovely dinner together. Do you have any dishes that make you feel nostalgic?

This recipe is very customizable. You just need a fat source, green beans, and your favorite spices. For this, I used pancetta, garlic, onion powder, salt and pepper, but feel free to change it up! You can use bacon instead of pancetta, or even make it meatless and use olive oil. I like the petite or French cut green beans because they are smaller and cook faster. You can use regular green beans, you will just need to increase the cooking time a bit since they are bigger.

Sautéed Pancetta and Green Beans

Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 4 oz cubed pancetta
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1-12 oz package frozen petite or French cut green beans
  • ½ tsp onion powder
  • Salt and pepper
  • ¼ cup slivered almonds

Instructions
 

  • Sauté pancetta and garlic over medium heat for about a few minutes, or until desired level of crispiness is achieved. Remove pancetta and garlic and set aside in a bowl.
  • Add green beans, onion powder, salt, and pepper to pan. If you want a little more oil, add a tsp of olive oil. Cook for about 10 minutes, or until the beans are hot all the way through.
  • While the beans are cooking, toast the almond slivers in a separate pan over medium heat. These will burn quickly, so keep an eye on them and toss them often.
  • When green beans are done, add the pancetta and garlic back to the pan and warm. Toss in the slivered almonds and mix to combine.

Post and recipe courtesy of Seena Curry.  Seena is a dietetics student at University of Alabama and expects to graduate in December. She hopes to find a career as a Registered Dietitian that combines her passions for food, nutrition education, and serving her community. Seena is a hobbyist food photographer and has an Instagram dedicated to her favorite recipes (sc_balancedeats). 

Let’s make New Year Revelations for 2019

It is that time of year again. As the New Year approaches, everyone begins formulating their New Year resolutions. More often than not, these resolutions focus on the desire to improve one’s health in some manner. For most, it is a resolution to eat less and move more in an effort to lose weight. While the intent is good, the approach is lacking.  

I offer a different approach for 2019, but first a brief vocabulary review. The word “resolution” is defined as: a firm decision to do or not do something; the action of solving a problem. The term itself is restrictive and implies you are in some way a “problem” that needs fixing. In order to promote self-care and, in turn, health and well-being, I suggest we make New Year Revelations. To further our vocabulary review, the word “revelation” is defined as: the making known something that was previously unknown; term used to emphasize a remarkable quality of someone or something. Wow!  What a great word! Now, a revelation promotes the discovery of all our remarkable qualities including what works best for us individually, rather than what society and the diet industry claims is best for us.  

It is common knowledge that fad diets do not work and the gym is not for everyone. There truly is no one-size-fits-all path to health. We are all as different as the snowflakes that may be falling as the ball drops on New Year’s Eve. Changing the focus from a restrictive or punishing mindset to positive curiosity makes the coming year an exciting adventure in self-discovery. If you must resolve to do something in 2019, resolve to do things differently.  

Here are some examples of New Year Revelations: 

In 2019, I will… 

  • Try a new food each month noticing the taste, texture, smell, and how it makes me feel (energy, satisfaction, etc.) 
  • Find movement I enjoy (walking, biking, swimming, yoga, playing tennis, dancing, etc.) 
  • Edit my social media feeds to include those who share my values and remove those who do not support me in my journey  
  • Establish a regular gratitude practice  
  • Learn more about intuitive eating 
  • Start meditating  
  • Expand my social circle  
  • Volunteer for an organization that shares my values 
  • Seek the assistance of a registered dietitian or health coach to partner with me on my journey to well-being (couldn’t leave that one out….shameless self-promotion acknowledged) 

In addition to our website, blog and podcast (coming in 2019), here are some links to give you a jumpstart on your New Year Revelations: 

https://www.intuitiveeating.org/10-principles-of-intuitive-eating/ 

https://www.gaiam.com/blogs/discover/meditation-101-techniques-benefits-and-a-beginner-s-how-to 

http://www.headspace.com 

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/40-simple-ways-practice-gratitude.html 

http://www.orangecountyfl.net/cultureparks/parks.aspx?m=search#.W_9ErzhKjIU

E is for Eggs

The bad rap suffered by eggs in the media for the past few decades is completely unwarranted. Eggs are the culinary “multi-tasker”. They can go from a quick, savory breakfast to a sweet, satisfying dessert with ease. To top it off, they are great for your brain! Choline, a nutrient found in the yolk of the egg, promotes healthy brain development and may also play a role in boosting memory. Below is just one way to enjoy this versatile food.

I’m all about a one-pan meal, especially for breakfast, because mornings can be hectic! Cooking everything in one pan is typically quick and saves me from doing a large pile of dishes. But I also really like to cook a big, hearty breakfast to satisfy my hunger. One-pan meals both help fill me up and get out the door on time. That’s why I love this single-serving frittata.

Frittatas are an egg-based Italian dish, similar to a quiche, but crustless. They are super easy to cook and can be customized in a variety of ways. You can use any of your favorite cheeses, meats, and/or vegetables in this recipe. The possibilities are endless! Frittatas are also great because you can just pour the eggs in and let it sit and cook. Finishing for a few minutes under the broiler firms up the top and ensures the cheese gets nice and melty. Feel free to try the below recipe as is or with all of your favorite ingredients!

Frittata

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • ¾ cup frozen hash browns
  • ½ bell pepper, chopped
  • ¼ cup chopped onion
  • ¾ cup sliced zucchini
  • 3 eggs
  • ¼ cup milk
  • Garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper
  • ¼ cup mozzarella cheese
  • 1-2 Tbsp pesto

Directions:

  • Heat oil in 8 inch cast iron skillet over medium heat. If you don’t have cast iron, use any 8 inch pan, you just won’t finish the dish in the oven.
  • Add hash browns, onion, and bell pepper and cook until potatoes are cooked through (about 6-8 minutes). Add zucchini slices and cook another 3-5 minutes.
  • As the vegetables are cooking, whisk eggs, milk, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and any other spices you want in a bowl.
  • Add eggs to cast iron and cook for about 5 minutes, until you can see the sides start to set. Add cheese to top.
  • Turn the broiler on High and place the cast iron pan in the oven and broil until lightly brown on the top. Make sure to keep an eye on it because it will burn fast. If you are using a different pan, flip the frittata and continue cooking on the stove.
  • Pull from oven and top with your favorite pesto.

 

Blog courtesy of Seena Curry. Seena is a dietetics student at University of Alabama and expects to graduate in December. She hopes to find a career as a Registered Dietitian that combines her passions for food, nutrition education, and serving her community. Seena is a hobbyist food photographer and has an Instagram dedicated to her favorite recipes (sc_balancedeats).

D is for Dill


Dill adds a unique, delicate flavor to recipes. When looking for dill in your grocery store, make sure that the stems and fronds (leaves) are crisp. If you aren’t going to use fresh dill right away, make sure to wrap it in a damp paper towel and store it in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Fresh dill tends to wilt fairly quickly and will lose much of its flavor after it dries out. Try this recipe for “Chicago style” chicken and dumplings as the weather turns chilly outside.

The first time I encountered “Chicago style” chicken and dumplings I was at first confused, then completely fell in love. This style of chicken and dumplings is more like chicken soup with dill and dumplings added at the very end. As a native Southerner, my only experience with chicken and dumplings had been the kind my mom and grandma made whenever I could convince them to roll out biscuit dough for dinner. I later a married in to my husband’s loud, large, and very kind family from Chicago. My father-in-law makes this throughout the winter and it is now a staple at our house as well.

Chicago Style Chicken and Dumplings

Broth:

  • 4 boxes chicken broth (OR boil 1 whole chicken in enough water to cover the entire chicken)
  • 3 chicken breasts
  • 2-4 Tbsp fresh dill, minced (to taste)
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (or about 1 Tbsp minced garlic in a jar)
  • ½ white onion, diced
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped

Dumplings:

  • 2 cups flour (whole wheat or white)
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup milk + more to reach sticky consistency

Directions:

  1. Pour broth in large pot, bring to a boil then add chicken breasts, dill, garlic, and onion
  2. Boil for approximately 10 minutes or until chicken is cooked all the way through.
  3. Remove chicken, allow to cool enough to pull apart then add back to the broth
  4. For dumplings, in a bowl mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Slowly add about ½ cup of milk at a time until the dumplings are sticky and no flour coats the sides of the bowl. Fully incorporate milk each time you add it to the flour.
  5. Lower heat to medium, make sure that the broth is no longer boiling before you start adding dumplings.
  6. Dump in 1 heaping Tbsp of dumpling mixture in to the broth, about 5 at a time. The dumplings should rise when they are finished cooking.
  7. Eat and enjoy!

Note: White flour will require less milk; whole wheat flour may require almost double the amount of milk.

This post brought to you by guest blogger, Shelley Palmer:

Shelley Palmer is a senior Food and Nutrition major at The University of Alabama. She aspires to become a Registered Dietitian working in long term geriatric care. As a military spouse, she has traveled all around the world with her husband. Shelley enjoys making kimchi from scratch, spending time with her dogs, and working as a cook at a Continuing Care Retirement Community.

C is for Cottage Cheese

Before I dive into cottage cheese, I want to give you a little background on why I chose cottage cheese for the letter ‘C’ above the plethora of other yummy ‘C’ foods. Growing up I would be classified as your typical “picky eater”. I survived on peanut butter sandwiches, chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, corn and green beans. That was pretty much the extent of my culinary palette. While my palette grew some as I reached adulthood, it really exploded when I began studying nutrition and dietetics.

I do not want to give the impression that this was simple. I didn’t wake up one morning and decide I liked spinach. I first tried a spinach artichoke dip at a local restaurant. Then, I tried some fresh spinach on my sub during my lunch break. Now, I enjoy spinach in quiches, casseroles and soups. However, I do NOT enjoy cooked spinach alone as a side, but that is fine. I experimented with a variety of ways to prepare spinach and discovered some yummy dishes to add to my dietary experiences. If I had started and stopped at the steamed spinach side, I would be missing out on my daughter’s favorite holiday appetizer – Spinach Balls. I know it does start with the letter ‘C’, but I couldn’t resist sharing as the holidays are upon us.

The point is to try new foods in a variety of ways before excluding it entirely. Hence, the choice of cottage cheese for this week’s post. Cottage cheese is a great source of protein and calcium with a nice splash of potassium. I know when it comes to cottage cheese most people love it or hate it, right? Well, I challenge you to be your own anthropologist and experiment with some different ways to enjoy cottage cheese. Here are a few ideas:

  • Spread it on toast and top with sliced tomatoes and fresh cracked pepper
  • Make cottage cheese patties (google for different recipe variations)
  • If you like it sweet, pair it with fruit like pineapple

Or you can try my favorite way to enjoy cottage cheese. I use it to make a super simple and tasty ranch dip.

Cottage Cheese Dip

What you will need:
  • 1 – 1 ½ cups of cottage cheese (I usually use small curd)
  • ½ packet of Hidden Valley Ranch powder dressing mix

Image of blender, cottage cheese container and powdered ranch dressing mix

Instructions:
Place all ingredients in blender or food processor and mix until smooth. Serve with your favorite veggies, crackers and/or pita chips for dipping.

Image purple bowl with cottage cheese dip surrounded by sliced cucumber and round crackers
Photo: Cottage Cheese Dip

 

The moral of this story is: You CAN teach an old taste bud new tricks!

Hope you found this post helpful in your own journey to expand your culinary palette. Please share your experience with new foods with us – the successes and the challenges.

B is for Berries

Every time I step into the grocery store and see those small plastic containers filled with fresh red raspberries, I’m instantly transported back to the memory of picking berries with my grandparents. It’s July, the sun is warm on my skin, and I’m standing in a thicket of berry bushes along the path at their mountain house in Pennsylvania. At eight years old, I can vividly remember the little cuts that were all over my hands and arms from reaching for the big juicy ones buried beneath the thorns. I was terrified of the possibility of spiders and bears around me. And to be honest, I still am afraid of both at 28! Anyways, back to the berries. The pain from those little thorns was all worth it when I got to lick a spoonful of my grandmother’s homemade jam.

Now as an adult, I’ve taken that memory of the sweet red raspberry jam and expanded the possibilities with that berry and so many others. The list is endless, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, lingonberries, gooseberries, cranberries… the list goes on, but I’ll save you the reading! No matter which one your favorite is, the versatility of berries makes them the perfect fruit to keep in your fridge or freezer.

The freezer. That mysterious cold place where food goes to be buried and forgotten about, but it doesn’t need to be that way. The freezer can be an incredible tool for storing fresh berries all year long. When berries are in season, you can usually save a lot of money by buying them in bulk. Take them home, wash them, lay them out in a layer of parchment paper lined cookie sheet and stick in the freezer. Once they have frozen, portion out the berries in Ziploc bags or better yet, vacuum seal them. Or, if you don’t want to fuss with freezing the berries yourself, there is an easier way…just buy them pre-frozen in your local grocery store! Grocery stores now carry all sorts of frozen varieties. You can buy a bag of just your favorite berry or buy a blend of several different kinds.

We have all come across berries in one form or another- jam, jelly, smoothies, baked goods, or a topping for a stack of pancakes; oatmeal; or yogurt. Whichever way you choose to eat these little antioxidant packed berries is up to you. However, one of my favorite ways is in frozen yogurt bark! There are plenty of varieties of recipes that you can find online, but one of my favorites is from Ciara at MyFussyEater.com. Coconut provides a great chew and sweetness to the bark. You may have heard of fro-yo, but berries take the popular dessert to a whole new level. The varieties are endless depending on the type of yogurt you prefer or the berries you want to use. And why stop there? You can add all sorts of other toppings to the bark…chocolate is my go-to! Yogurt bark is the perfect snack for morning or night. It’s also an easy recipe that your kiddos can help create.

 

Frozen Yogurt Bar

Ingredients:

  • 1 large container of your favorite yogurt
  • 2 cups of berries
  • ½ cup shredded coconut
  • ½ cup chocolate chips
  • 4 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • 4 Tbsp. honey

 

 

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix your yogurt with the honey. (You can skip the honey if you already have a yogurt that is sweetened. Adding honey is best for plain yogurts without flavoring, especially the plain tangy yogurts like Greek or Icelandic.)
  2. Spread out the yogurt on a parchment paper lined baking sheet. Make it pretty and smooth!
  3. Next, sprinkle all of your ingredients evenly over the yogurt. I used fresh strawberries and red raspberries and I added some frozen blueberries and blackberries. I find it best to push some of the bigger berries into the yogurt to make sure they will ‘stick’ when we go to cut it and eat it later.
  4. Once you’re satisfied with your creation, stick it in the freezer and let it sit for 4-6 hours. Make sure it’s level! I usually make this towards the end of the night and let it freeze while I sleep. In the morning, I have a great on the go morning snack!
  5. Once the yogurt has completely frozen, carefully remove the parchment paper from the pan and lay the bark on a cutting board or a flat counter. Cut the bark into bars for easy snacking. You can put each bar in a separate Ziploc bag or in a plastic container. Just be sure to place parchment paper between each one.

So what else can we make with berries? Obviously, we all love the sweet taste of a blueberry muffin or raspberry strudel, but that’s too easy. I do love a spinach salad with strawberries, goat cheese, and walnuts, but again, that’s too ordinary. We could cook the berries down with some agave or honey and make a delicious syrup for our Sunday morning breakfast, but even that’s not interesting enough. Okay, I’ve got it. How about chicken? Yes, that’s right, let’s take that beloved chicken breast and pair it with red raspberries.

Sometimes when I have too many red raspberries leftover from my yogurt bark creation, I’ll make this raspberry chicken recipe for a quick and tasty meal. There are many recipes online, but Trisha Yearwood’s version is probably my favorite that I’ve found so far. The earthy flavor of the mushrooms paired with the tangy raspberries and lemon zest really makes this dish pop. Of course, you can substitute your favorite berry and play around with added ingredients. Don’t be afraid to try new flavors. After all, that’s how some of the best dishes were created. And in case you have kids who are fussing over the fancy chicken breast, you can always make them traditional chicken fingers and pair them with a homemade blueberry barbeque sauce.

Raspberry Chicken

Ingredients:

  •  4 chicken tenders or cutlets
  • 1 cup red raspberries
  • 4 Tbsp. EVOO
  • 3 gloves garlic, minced
  • 1 large shallot, diced
  • 3-4 mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup chicken stock/broth
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  • Fresh lemon zest (I like a lot!)
  • Salt & pepper to season the chicken

 

Directions:

  1. Heat EVOO in saucepan over medium heat
  2. Season the chicken and place into warm oil. Brown on both sides then remove from pan.
  3. Add garlic & shallots to the saucepan. Cook about 1 minute.
  4. Add in chicken stock and white wine. Reduce down for about 8-10 minutes over medium heat.
  5. Add in sliced mushrooms and cook on a simmer for about 3-4 minutes
  6. Place the chicken breasts back into the saucepan and cook until finished, about 10 minutes.
  7. Add the raspberries, balsamic vinegar, butter, and lemon zest and cook for about 1 minute.
  8. Serve alone or over your favorite grain. It goes great with quinoa.
  9. Lick the plate…it’s that good!

With their versatility, berries can be included into your daily food intake with ease. Keep them frozen, buy them fresh, make something sweet or make something savory. No matter what recipe you put these colorful little berries in, just be sure to enjoy it!

 

 

Brooke Wiseman is a Food and Nutrition major at the University of Alabama, who is studying to become a Registered Dietitian with a concentration in community nutrition and wellness. In May of 2017, Brooke graduated from Gaston College in North Carolina and received her AAS as a Dietetic Technician. Shortly after graduation, she passed her NDTR (Nutrition and Dietetic Technician, Registered) exam. Within the last two months, Brooke passed her national exam and earned a certification as a personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). Brooke currently works at the local YMCA as a trainer and an adult fitness specialist. As a military spouse, Brooke hopes to use her knowledge of nutrition and exercise experience to help others reach their goals where their family ends up next.

 

CONTENT WARNING: Our blog posts contain links to websites owned and operated by third parties. If you use these links, you leave our site and the safe space we strive to provide. These links are provided for your information and convenience only and are NOT an endorsement by Annette Adams, RDN, LD/N. While we take great effort to limit any potentially triggering content, Annette Adams, RDN, LD/N has no control over the content of any linked website and is not responsible for these websites or their content.

 

A is for Avocado

Avocado is a great addition to any meal or snack. Haas avocados are a good source of Folate (vitamin B9) which has been found to support brain function. They also assist the body in the transport of vitamins A, D, E and K. This fruit (yes, it is a fruit) can be enjoyed all by itself, in a soup, on a salad, or as a spread.

Simply spread one-third to one-half of an avocado on your favorite toast for a quick and easy breakfast. Tip: Check out this video on how to easily cut an avocado.

What is the first thing that usually comes to mind when you hear Avocado? Most likely, you think guacamole. Below you will find a new twist on the traditional guacamole dip. Try this salsa at your next gathering. It is sure to be a hit.

Avocado Salsa

Avocado Dip with Chips
Avocado Salsa

Ingredients

  • 3 tomatillos
  • 1 jalapeno
  • 1-2 avocados
  • ¾ cup chopped onion
  • 3 cloves garlic

    Handful of cilantro (about ½ cup)

  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp salt

Directions

  1. Place jalapeno and husked tomatillos on a baking sheet and place in the oven. Broil until they have light brown skins. Place aside to cool enough to touch.
  2. Place avocados, chopped onions, garlic, cilantro, lime juice, salt and cooled tomatillos and jalapeno in a blender. Blend until smooth.

Hint: you can easily adjust the heat with less (or more) jalapenos.

Do you have a fun way to enjoy avocados or did you try one of the ideas in this post?  If so, we want to hear from you!  Please comment below and share the fun.

 

Recipe courtesy of Seena Curry. Seena is a dietetics student at University of Alabama and expects to graduate in December. She hopes to find a career as a Registered Dietitian that combines her passions for food, nutrition education, and serving her community. Seena is a hobbyist food photographer and has an Instagram dedicated to her favorite recipes (sc_balancedeats).

 

Series : Food Fun from A to Z

Introducing a new series here on the Nutrition Anthropology blog – Food Fun from A to Z! After all, food is meant to be enjoyed and we want to show you fun ways to enjoy foods throughout the alphabet (Spoiler Alert: the letter X is going to be eXtra fun). We are sure you remember your preschool alphabet lesson – A is for apple and B is for Banana. Well, we won’t be that predictable because Nutrition Anthropology is all about experimenting and approaching life with curiosity. With the help of awesome dietetic students from The University of Alabama, each week we will share stories and recipes introducing you to some unique foods as well as some common foods presented in unique ways. Our goal is to help you discover the fun in food.  Be on the lookout for our first post.  A is for Avocado.

CONTENT WARNING: Our blog posts contain links to websites owned and operated by third parties. If you use these links, you leave our site and the safe space we strive to provide. These links are provided for your information and convenience only and are NOT an endorsement by Annette Adams, RDN, LD/N. While we take great effort to limit any potentially triggering content, Annette Adams, RDN, LD/N has no control over the content of any linked website and is not responsible for these websites or their content.

What is Nutrition Anthropology?

Before we jump into Nutrition Anthropology specifically, I think it would be a good idea to define anthropology itself. According to Merriam-Webster, anthropology is “the science of human beings; especially: the study of human beings and their ancestors through time and space and in relation to physical character, environmental and social relations, and culture”. Nutritional anthropology narrows that focus to food and food systems.

With that in mind, let’s talk about what I mean by Nutrition Anthropology and why it is the title of this blog and the future podcast. Registered dietitians are often touted as the food experts. I would argue that this may be true. Goodness knows we have dedicated a large portion of our lives to studying all things food. However, I believe you are the expert of YOU. I may know the chemical makeup of broccoli and how a digestive system breaks it down into its various nutrients. What I don’t know is how your body reacts to broccoli or how you perceive its taste/texture or how you feel after eating broccoli. I am always telling my clients to “be your own anthropologist”. Experiment with different foods. Notice how they taste and smell. Observe without judgment how particular foods make you feel. Just like anthropology in general, I encourage my clients to go beyond the food. Let’s explore your environment, your culture and your social relationships. How do those things impact your nutrition? With curiosity comes knowledge and with knowledge comes achievement. If you want to reach your wellness goals, start by being curious.

And so, Nutrition Anthropology was born. It truly is the basis for my practice and my approach to well-being. I invite you to join me on this adventure to discover your best self. I offer you a safe space as you explore a positive relationship with food and body.